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Special Projects

Thursday, March 27, 2014
Intractable intergroup conflicts, such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, represent the greatest threats we face as a species. These conflicts are inherently psychological, but social psychologists have only recently begun applying their methods to analyze and perhaps help heal these conflicts. In this Special Project, SPARQ Faculty Affiliates Carol Dweck and James Gross are collaborating with Eran Halperin of the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel...
Friday, March 7, 2014
The Prison University Project (PUP) is the only onsite education program in the state of California that offers prisoners the opportunity to earn a college degree. PUP serves the inmates at San Quentin State Prison, California’s oldest and most notorious correctional facility, and is one of the largest prison education programs in the nation. By all indications, PUP has been extremely successful. But to improve its performance, attract funding, and expand to other prisons, PUP must conduct a more systematic evaluation...
Friday, February 28, 2014
Human Organ for Transplant
Every ten minutes, a person in need of a new liver, kidney, heart, or other organ is added to the transplant waiting list. Many of these patients will die for want of an organ. African Americans, Asian Americans, and other people of color are more likely to die than are European Americans because fewer people of color register to be organ donors. Fewer people of color also allow doctors to transplant the organs of deceased family members. To tackle this problem, SPARQ has teamed up with Dr. Richard Ha...
Saturday, October 5, 2013

The need for social psychological answers to real-world questions hit SPARQ close to home. Our founding faculty director, Nalini Ambady, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia. To survive, she needed a bone marrow transplant. And so many members of the Stanford community launched a massive get out the donor campaign in the U.S. and India, Nalini's homeland. During this campaign, we discovered many opportunities to improve the recruitment and retention of bone marrow donors...

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Women faculty, especially women of color, are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), despite more than 40 years of Title IX, affirmative action, and concerted efforts to "equip the women," "level the playing field," and "value diversity." Research has failed to identify innate gender differences that would explain this lack of gender parity. Instead, cultural factors seem to drive what Yale astrophysicist Meg Urry calls a "slow drumbeat of [women] being underappreciated, feeling uncomfortable, and encountering roadblocks along the path to success." Using a model of cultural change developed by Stanford social psychologists, this Special Project will...